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Politicization of the ecological debate

1) Welcome to Capitalocene!

The book “Welcome to Anthropocene” by Paul Crutzen has been published in Italy in 2000: it declared that humanity had changed the climate, leading the planet to a new geological era: the Anthropocene. Since then the theoretical debate has begun to question the non-political approach of the dominant discourse around Anthropocene. We’ll begin  with the analysis of the concept of Capitalocene by the marxist sociologist Jason W. Moore to re-consider the close link between politics and ecology.

With Giulio Sapori, editor of  Liberazioni magazine, antiespeciesist activist, he studies philosophy, ecology and antiespeciesism from a political perspective

2) Vegan: style of consumption or political action?

Veganism has been the practice in which animal liberation movements identified itself for many years. Today, in addition to this, it is a growing market niche, almost encouraged by corporations. Although the same anti-speciesist narrative often reduces it to a diet or a “lifestyle”, veganism can be considered a real political practice, which, instead of being fossilized on the level of individual consumption, suggests collective political actions. A “critical veganism” is accompanied by the passage from a generic activism for animal rights, a posture that is disinterested in “human” social struggles, often paternalistic and moderate, to antispeciesism, in the sense of an intersectional theory and praxis for animal liberation.

With Marco Reggio, antiespeciesist activist and member of Resistenza Animale collective, he researches the intersections between queer theory and antiespeciesism.
He edited  ‘Smontare la gabbia’ (Desmantling the cage), ‘Corpi che non contano. Judith Butler e gli animali’ (Bodies that don’t matter. Judith Butler and the animals), ‘Animali in rivolta’ (Animal revolt) and the italian edition of the ‘Queer vegan Manifesto’.

3) Toxication 1o1

For years the interrelation between gender and environmental activism has been ignored having little to no attention. Toxication 1o1 aims to open a space to bring the debate about how the current modern system it is ruled by a patriarchal model perpetuated by toxic masculinities and unhealthy gender relations. Our contemporary society promotes a system that alienates us in our relationships with our environment and the people around us. It praises a regime that rules with a eurocentric approach in regards to human relations, patterns of consumption, and our understanding of nature and even about the current ecological crisis. Kopuntu Collective invites you you to a dynamic session that will make us question our situatedness, perspectives, and understanding of the ‘environmental crisis and discourse’.

With Gabriella Rojas and Christian Siebert, from Kopuntu.
Kopuntu means ‘diaspora’ but also ‘ruptured piece’: initially born from people hailing from Turkey, the collective aims to go beyond the polirizing concepts of nationality, religion, ethnicity, towards a ‘New Generation Diaspora’. Kopuntu speaks through an online magazine and puts together interdisciplinary events (exhibitions, talks, screenings, workshops and performances) to bring out new debates and narratives under the umbrella of new social movements, combining different approaches between the academy, grassroots and art scene.

4) From fossil democracies to an ecological democracy: proposal for a political renewal

What relationship exists between the ecological crisis and the crisis of the so-called western, representative, liberal democracy? We live the anguish of a clear inconsistency between the awareness of the ecological urgency and the inadequacy of the political responses to it. But the shift from the protest towards the construction of actual policies is not only possible, but it is already happening. We’ll outline some radical renewal experiences  within the democratic processes through the examples of people who re-thought their own form of organization and their relationship with the environment.

With Marco Deriu, researcher in “Sociology of cultural and communicative processes” and Assistant Professor of “Sociology of political and environmental communication” at the Department Of Humanities, Social Sciences And Cultural Industries of the University of Parma (Italy). He is a member of the Italian Degrowth Association and of the national association Maschile Plurale and of the local associations ‘Maschi che si immischiano’ and ‘Circolo della differenza’ in Parma.

 

5) Emergency! A justification for direct action

Though we have known about environmental destruction for a long time, governments and societies have failed miserably. When the course is set to catastrophe, extraordinary means are not only morally justfiable but also the only responsible option. Participants of this workshop will discuss the ethics of direct action and will be provided with some practicable examples. We will cover not just a justification, but also the duty to protect the planet.

Con Didem Aydurmuş, PhD in Ecopolitics from Bilgi University, M.A. in Cultural Anthropology from Heidelberg University, avid environmental and animal rights activist since a decade. Last worked for the Member of European Parliament Stefan Bernhard Eck in the Communist political group and currently works for the European Citizen Initiative “End the Cage Age.”
She’s also part of Kopuntu Collective: Kopuntu means ‘diaspora’ but also ‘ruptured piece’: initially born from people hailing from Turkey, the collective aims to go beyond the polirizing concepts of nationality, religion, ethnicity, towards a ‘New Generation Diaspora’. Kopuntu speaks through an online magazine and puts together interdisciplinary events (exhibitions, talks, screenings, workshops and performances) to bring out new debates and narratives under the umbrella of new social movements, combining different approaches between the academy, grassroots and art scene.